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Workplace trends

Phoenix Business Journal
Fri, 2013-03-22

Highlights: Addiction to prescription pain pills is impacting productivity in the workplace, costing employers as much as $13,000 for each drug user per year and health insurers up to $72.5 billion each year nationwide.

DFBS Note: Compelling story of worker's addiction that began with prescription for pain medication.

Quest Diagnostics Drug Testing Index™
Thu, 2013-03-07

Highlights: Job candidates subject to pre-employment drug screening tested positive for illicit drugs at a greater rate in the first six months of 2012 than in all of 2011. The uptick in U.S. general workforce pre-employment data suggests that employers should be mindful of illicit drug use among prospective employees,” said Dr. Barry Sample, Director of Science and Technology for Quest Diagnostics Employer Solutions. “These findings align with recent news reports citing some employers facing increasing drug positives when recruiting new workers.”

Quest Diagnostics
Thu, 2013-03-07

Highlights: Job candidates subject to pre-employment drug screening tested positive for illicit drugs at a greater rate in the first six months of 2012 than in all of 2011. The uptick in U.S. general workforce pre-employment data suggests that employers should be mindful of illicit drug use among prospective employees. The positivity rate in pre-employment urine drug screening for the federally mandated, safety-sensitive workforce remained unchanged from 2011 through the first half of 2012.

Huffington Post
Thu, 2013-03-07

Highlights: Job applicants are testing positively for drugs at rates not seen since 2007, according to data from Quest Diagnostics. Employers are having some difficulty finding employees who can pass a drug test. Marijuana continues to be the drug of choice.

Risk and Insurance
Fri, 2013-03-01

Highlights: The workers' compensation industry and the pharmacy benefit managers who help employers manage prescription medication are getting ready for a new class of painkillers. "There has never been a more damaging impact on the cost of workers' compensation claims from a single issue than the abuse of opioid prescriptions for the management of chronic pain," according to a report by Mo.-based insurance broker Lockton Cos.

Springfield News-Sun
Sun, 2013-01-27

DFBS note: Substance abuse problems among Ohio workers can result in workplace injuries, higher medical costs for their employers, more absenteeism and reduced productivity, according to survey data and experts. Companies that implement drug testing and promote drug-free workplace policies are less likely to have drug users apply for their job openings, experts said. In 2012, 6,300 employers in Ohio participated in the state’s Drug-Free Safety Program.

CNN
Mon, 2012-10-01

Highlights: An internal report by Amtrak's Office of Inspector General new report blasts Amtrak, the nation's largest passenger rail carrier, for dangerously overlooking drug and alcohol use by its employees. Amtrak's employees failed drug and alcohol tests at a staggering 51% higher rate than the rail industry average, the report said. The majority of employees who failed drug tests were reported to have tested positive for cocaine and marijuana, according to the report.

Risk and Insurance
Wed, 2012-09-12

Highlights: In Arkansas, a worker's admission that he used illegal drugs that made it harder for him to concentrate will make it difficult for him to rebut the presumption that his injury was substantially occasioned by the use of illegal drugs. The Arkansas Court of Appeals held that a worker was not entitled to benefits because his injury was substantially occasioned by the use of illegal drugs.

DFBS note:

Risk and Insurance
Wed, 2012-09-12

Highlights: The Arkansas Court of Appeals held that a worker was not entitled to benefits because his injury was substantially occasioned by the use of illegal drugs. A worker's admission that he used illegal drugs that made it harder for him to concentrate will make it difficult for him to rebut the presumption that his injury was substantially occasioned by the use of illegal drugs.

USA Today
Wed, 2012-07-11

Highlights: This rise of Opana abuse illustrates the adaptability of drug addicts and the never-ending challenge facing law enforcement authorities, addiction specialists and pharmaceutical companies. Just when they think they have curbed abuse and stopped trafficking of one drug, another fills the void. Opana's dangerous new popularity arose when OxyContin's manufacturer changed its formula to deter users from crushing, breaking or dissolving the pill so it could be snorted or injected to achieve a high.

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