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Topics: alcohol, drugs, workers, workplaces

Info to help you maintain a drug-free work environment.

Trends / costs

Reuters
Thu, 2012-09-06

Highlights: More than half of U.S. drivers killed in car accidents had alcohol or drugs in their system at the time of the crash, according to a new study.

DFBS note: Think about that while your employees are on the road, and how to keep from contributing to these statistics.

The New England Journal of Medicine
Thu, 2012-07-12

Highlights: In August 2010, an abuse-deterrent formulation of the widely abused prescription opioid OxyContin was introduced to make OxyContin more difficult to solubilize or crush, thus discouraging abuse through injection and inhalation. This formulation successfully reduced Oxycontin abuse, but also led to an increase in the use of heroin, a drug that may pose a much greater overall risk to public health than OxyContin.

DFBS note: Kind of like "whack-a-drug-mole".

USA Today
Wed, 2012-07-11

Highlights: This rise of Opana abuse illustrates the adaptability of drug addicts and the never-ending challenge facing law enforcement authorities, addiction specialists and pharmaceutical companies. Just when they think they have curbed abuse and stopped trafficking of one drug, another fills the void. Opana's dangerous new popularity arose when OxyContin's manufacturer changed its formula to deter users from crushing, breaking or dissolving the pill so it could be snorted or injected to achieve a high.

The Partnership at DrugFree.org
Wed, 2012-07-11

Highlights: The rise in popularity of the painkiller Opana illustrates the challenges facing law enforcement ... Opana misuse became more common after the company that makes OxyContin reformulated the drug to make it more difficult to abuse.

DFBS note: Illegal drug markets adapt quickly. Keep up with trends to anticipate what you may see in your workforce.

FloridaToday
Sun, 2012-02-05

Highlights: Oxycodone abuse progresses quickly, devastating families and destroying addicts.

State of California, Office of Traffic Safety
Sat, 2011-11-19

Highlights: Drugs that can affect driving were found in one of every seven weekend nighttime drivers in California, according to the first-ever statewide roadside survey of alcohol and drug use by drivers. The survey results announced today by the California Office of Traffic Safety (OTS) showed more drivers tested positive for drugs that may impair driving (14 percent) than did for alcohol (7.3 percent). Of the drugs, marijuana was most prevalent, at 7.4 percent, slightly more than alcohol.

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