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Topics: alcohol, drugs, workers, workplaces

Info to help you maintain a drug-free work environment.

Workplaces

Risk and Insurance
Mon, 2012-12-03

Highlights: Several studies associate workers' marijuana smoking with increased absences, tardiness, accidents, workers' compensation claims, and job turnover. When viewed in light of the primary goal in workers' compensation, which is to return to work, the issue becomes much clearer. The therapeutic effects of medical marijuana treatment are counterintuitive to meeting the intended therapeutic outcome for any injured worker.

DATIA
Sat, 2012-12-01

Highlights: In highly regulated work environments such as the DOT mandated drug and alcohol-testing industry, regulatory mandated training, qualifications and certification present non-trivial challenges to the student, the trainer, and the employer. The costs of compliance are a significant ongoing expense to the business while the cost of non-compliance (such as a PIE) can be insurmountable.

DFBS note: Which why we make our training so cost-effective and easy to use, not to mention engaging (IMHO).

CNN
Mon, 2012-10-01

Highlights: An internal report by Amtrak's Office of Inspector General new report blasts Amtrak, the nation's largest passenger rail carrier, for dangerously overlooking drug and alcohol use by its employees. Amtrak's employees failed drug and alcohol tests at a staggering 51% higher rate than the rail industry average, the report said. The majority of employees who failed drug tests were reported to have tested positive for cocaine and marijuana, according to the report.

Occupational Health and Safety
Mon, 2012-10-01

Highlights: In addition to promoting a safer, more productive workplace, drug testing can help to decrease employee turnover and absenteeism, reduce employer risk, and lower workers' compensation incidence rates, according to Drug Testing Efficacy 2011, a recent poll conducted by The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) and the Drug and Alcohol Testing Industry Association (DATIA).

Testing
Risk and Insurance
Wed, 2012-09-12

Highlights: In Arkansas, a worker's admission that he used illegal drugs that made it harder for him to concentrate will make it difficult for him to rebut the presumption that his injury was substantially occasioned by the use of illegal drugs. The Arkansas Court of Appeals held that a worker was not entitled to benefits because his injury was substantially occasioned by the use of illegal drugs.

DFBS note:

Risk and Insurance
Wed, 2012-09-12

Highlights: The Arkansas Court of Appeals held that a worker was not entitled to benefits because his injury was substantially occasioned by the use of illegal drugs. A worker's admission that he used illegal drugs that made it harder for him to concentrate will make it difficult for him to rebut the presumption that his injury was substantially occasioned by the use of illegal drugs.

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
Sun, 2012-07-29

Highlights: Over the last four years, some 38,000 would-be truck drivers applying at Schneider National, Inc. have had their hair snipped for a drug test. Of those, 1411 failed. Yet more than 90 percent of those 1,411 applicants were able to pass a urine test.

Risk and Insurance
Tue, 2012-07-03

Highlights: The U.S. District Court, Southern District of Texas granted summary judgment to an employer on an operator's claims under the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Family and Medical Leave Act. According to this court, the ADA's definition of an employee with a disability does not include an individual engaging in the illegal misuse of prescription painkillers.

FarmWeekNow.com
Fri, 2012-04-27

Highlights: The FMCSA has published guidance on this requirement.

EHSToday
Thu, 2012-04-05

Highlights: A new study suggests that supervisors who demonstrate they can identify workplace substance abuse are more likely to have an impact on preventing or putting a stop to this dangerous behavior. It's only when employees think their supervisor knows how to detect substance use and is willing to do something about it that employees' drinking and drug use on the job decreases.

DFBS note: What better argument for providing reasonable suspicion training for your supervisors?

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