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Topics: alcohol, drugs, workers, workplaces

Info to help you maintain a drug-free work environment.

Most recent

SAMHSA
2013-05-01

Highlights: A new report shows that the number of emergency department visits involving adverse reactions to the sleep medication zolpidem rose nearly 220 percent from 6,111 visits in 2005 to 19,487 visits in 2010. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) report also finds that in 2010 patients aged 45 or older represented about three-quarters (74 percent) of all emergency department visits involving adverse reactions to zolpidem.

Denver Business Journal
2013-04-25

Highlights: Colorado employers are within their legal rights to fire marijuana users, even though it’s legal under state law, the Colorado Court of Appeals ruled Thursday in a case about a former Dish Network Corp. employee terminated for using medical marijuana off-duty.

USA Today
2013-04-25

Highlights: Powerful prescription painkillers have become pricier and harder to use. So addicts across the USA are turning to this more volatile drug. The new twist: Heroin is no longer just an inner-city plague.

DFBS Note: Be on the lookout - workplaces follow communities in drug use.

The Partnership at DrugFree.org
2013-04-22

Highlights: New, nationally projectable survey results confirmed that one in four teens has misused or abused a prescription (Rx) drug at least once in their lifetime – a 33 percent increase over the past five years. The Partnership Attitude Tracking Study (PATS) also found troubling data on teen misuse or abuse of prescription stimulants. Contributing to this sustained trend in teen medicine abuse are the lax attitudes and beliefs of parents and caregivers.

DFBS note: Point one: teens are future workers. Point two: Parents (i.e., workers) don't have a clue. Could be some education would help.

HealthDay News
2013-04-22

Highlights: A pill may work as well as a puff when it comes to using marijuana to treat pain, according to a small but carefully controlled new study. Pain relief from pills may last longer, however, and may not leave people feeling as high as they do after they smoke the drug.

Marijuana
Los Angeles Tims
2013-03-29

Highlights: Despite efforts by law enforcement and public health officials to curb prescription drug abuse, drug-related deaths in the United States have continued to rise. Figures from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reveal that drug fatalities increased 3% in 2010, the most recent year for which complete data are available. Preliminary data for 2011 indicate the trend has continued.